Ludomir Różycki’s ravishing, late-romantic Violin Concerto was begun in the weeks leading to the Warsaw Uprising against Nazi terror in 1944 and left unfinished when he fled his birthplace. Thought lost, it was re-discovered by Janusz Wawrowski whose orchestral completion revels in a luxurious melodic language that positions Różycki as a kindred spirit of Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Cast in two movements, the opening Andante wears it lyrical heart on its sleeve, Wawrowski imbuing the lilting, weeping violin line with singing sweetness and sincerity, rising sympathetically with it to a moment of heightened ecstasy before ending again in bewitching reverie.

There’s something, albeit well disguised, of Gershwin’s jazzy brio pulsing through the relaxed, free-flowing spirit of the Allegro deciso finale, punctuated by fleeting theatrical flourishes and carried along by warming washes of orchestral colour. Moving from the mercurial to the mannered with judiciously handled aplomb, Wawrowski marshals the extremes of virtuosity and finesse more adroitly than Ewelina Nowicka (Acte Préalable) and benefits from fine, idiomatic...