CutCommon announces a new, fee-free service aimed at promoting the distribution of new music.

CutCommon, an Australian online magazine aimed at “the new generation of classical music”, has today announced an initiative that will see it become a digital music retailer. As of December 1, 2015CutCommon will provide exclusive access to scores and recordings from emerging composers.

“The launch of this shop continues our mission of supporting emerging artists across the country,” says Stephanie Eslake, founder of CutCommon and regular Limelight contributor. “Not only does it provide a platform for Australia’s talented composers to expose and distribute their works, but I believe it will further build a sense of community for those starting out in their musical careers.” Unlike some of the similar international services which already exist, CutCommon’s approach is “to promote fairness for artists”. They will achieve this by not demanding a listing fee or by taking a commission from the sale price set by the composer.

Several young and rising talents have warmly welcomed this latest development. Brisbane-based composer, and winner of the 2015 Chamber Music Australia’s Australian New Works Award, Connor D’Netto said that, “the opportunity for emerging composers to spread their music about Australia’s vibrant music scene and have it distributed directly to CutCommon’s huge base of fans is unlike anything else offered on this scale.” Sydney-based Victoria Pham, a Sydney Conservatorium graduate, is also excited about the new avenues that this initiative presents. “The CutCommon shop offers emerging performers and composers the chance to engage with a diverse range of individuals and audiences that we may not have had the opportunity to interact with previously.”

As well as offering a digital store, CutCommon will also provide an in-house mastering service, “ensuring music can be released with confidence”. This service will be run by emerging sound engineer-composer Christopher Leon, who has audio experience across film, television, and radio.

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