It’s Easter morning. The sky is a patchwork of blue and white and the air has a tiny edge of crispness to it. A respectable crowd are gathered outside the Windsong Pavillion, drinking coffee, and pacing up and down as they wait for the doors to open. A Four Winds production manager hurries around offering hot cross buns.

“We’re keeping the hall cool for the lute,” she explains to the restless attendees, who have got up early to hear the legendary Dame Emma Kirkby sing. Understanding nods from everyone. Of course. The lute.

Emma Kirkby, Four Winds Jakob Lindberg and Dame Emma Kirkby at the Four Winds Festival. Photo © Ben Marden

***

Jeremy Rose, composer and saxophonist ,is at the side of the Sound Shell stage, jabbing at what looks like a mobile phone in between movements of his work, River Meeting Suite. It isa mobile phone.

“He’s not checking his messages,” says one of the performers. “He’s changing the drone,” then explains how the sound of the bulky and rare instrument that would usually provide the drone in traditional Indian classical music is being streamed.

Four Winds

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