The elder statesman of Flamenco on his climb from poverty to acclaim and sharing the stage with a rock icon.

Flamenco master Paco Peña, the legendary 74-year-old Spanish guitar virtuoso, isn’t just a leading expert in this art form – he was born into it. Raised at the epicentre of the Flamenco tradition, in the Andalusian town of Córdoba, Peña’s infancy was immersed in the culture of Spain’s most revered craft.

Picking up the guitar aged just six-years-old, music and dance were ever-present elements in Peña’s childhood, he tells me. “I think children are always drawn to what’s around them, what’s in their genes. For me, that was the guitar and Flamenco,” Peña explains. “I was one of nine children in my family, and we lived in a house where 11 other families also lived. We all shared the same patio, the same tap for water and so on, and all those people under just one roof all belonged to the culture that gave birth to Flamenco. All of them sang, danced, played, or just clapped in time to the song. Any celebration or special occasion, Flamenco would always be at the centre of it. So...

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