The widely accepted opinion of Saint-Saëns is that, yes, he was an extremely good composer, but… And even if the ‘but’ is not explicitly stated, it’s often implied, giving the impression that in his beautifully crafted music there’s something missing – some inner core of passion, of what the Germans call schwung. Is this true? Or is it just that we’re looking for the wrong things? The answer might be found if we consider the composer’s relationships with his musical contemporaries: what they thought of him, and what he thought of them.

Lived1835-1921
Mostly inFrance
Best known for  The Carnival of the Animals, Danse Macabre, Organ Symphony, Samson et Delila
Similar to Fauré, Tchaikovsky

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